The Business of Conservation

2022-08-02T13:34:12+00:00August 2nd, 2022|Honeyguide News, News, Wildlife Protection|

  With over 30,000 hectares invested, with revenues exceeding half a million dollars, over 15,000 shareholders expecting a return on their investment, this is a complex business, it is the business of conservation. Wildlife Management Areas are social businesses, they require funding to operate and provide tangible benefits to the communities that surround them. As

Slash Those Protection Costs

2022-08-02T14:09:13+00:00August 2nd, 2022|Honeyguide News, News, Wildlife Protection|

  Protection costs consume around 60% of the total operating budgets for many African conservation areas, be it national parks or the smaller community conservation areas. Most National Parks in Africa (such as the Serengeti) annually spend between 500-800 USD per square km for protection, we can see some of the more financially challenged protected

Investing in Sustainable Solutions

2022-06-07T06:06:19+00:00June 7th, 2022|Enterprise Development, Honeyguide News, Management & Governance|

We at Honeyguide are often reminded that not all community areas can become financially sustainable, and whilst I totally understand this, I believe that many can achieve financial independence. We are a naturally optimistic organization, we have to be in order to approach such ambitious objectives and celebrate these fabulous results with our community partners.

A guide on how to get an elephant out of a mud pit

2022-05-04T16:17:38+00:00May 4th, 2022|Human-Wildlife Conflict Prevention, News, Wildlife Protection|

Late one night last week, the Makame Rangers were alerted by a member of the local community about an elephant that was stuck deep in a waterhole. The rangers found a young bull elephant stuck knee-deep in a pit of mud soup that could not climb out because it was so slippery and the banks

Story Map of Randilen

2022-01-19T09:13:15+00:00January 19th, 2022|Community News, Enterprise Development, Honeyguide News, Human-Wildlife Conflict Prevention, Wildlife Protection|

The patterns of wildlife that move across the landscapes, how man and wildlife have an interdependence, where man benefits from wildlife, wildlife from man; the exigencies of life in these vast and wild landscapes. Wildlife in Tanzania needs large landscapes in order to survive. They move onto village land that is owned by local communities

Once upon a time there was a buffalo rescue

2021-11-30T19:22:11+00:00November 9th, 2021|Human-Wildlife Conflict Prevention, Management & Governance, News|

  Where would you like to see wildlife in Africa in thirty or fifty-plus years' time? Will our grandchildren listen to ‘once upon a time’ stories when wildlife roamed the vast plains of Africa or will we leave them the opportunity to experience it, have the ability for their soul to speak to, and touch

Listening to SAGE in Makame

2021-07-07T03:26:00+00:00June 11th, 2021|Honeyguide News, Management & Governance, News|

  “This experience was like a mirror, it made us look into ourselves like we have never done before” was a statement by an elder during a SAGE workshop held recently in Makame. We have had unexpected comments and powerful feedback from communities when they have engaged in the SAGE process. Towards the end of

It’s a close call for elephant and man

2021-04-24T05:31:48+00:00April 23rd, 2021|Human-Wildlife Conflict Prevention, News|

In December 2020 a village member called Mjomba Soinge was herding his livestock home when he came across an elephant, it chased him and unfortunately caught up with him and trampled him. He survived. He was rushed to hospital and admitted with a potential medical bill of around $2000. Randilen Wildlife Management Area swiftly responded

New Recruits join the Serengeti K9 Unit

2020-10-07T14:04:26+00:00August 10th, 2020|Wildlife Protection|

The chase was on. The Serengeti canine (K9) unit was hot on the track of another poacher. Emmanuel Issak , lead handler of the K9 unit, was still a little anxious, as he had only recently received the unit’s new dogs from our partners, the African Wildlife Foundation. He not only wanted to see how

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